Last edited by Nikojora
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

2 edition of Alsace to the Alsatians? found in the catalog.

Alsace to the Alsatians?

Christopher J. Fischer

Alsace to the Alsatians?

visions and divisions of Alsatian regionalism, 1870-1939

by Christopher J. Fischer

  • 377 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Berghahn Books in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Regionalism -- France -- Alsace -- History,
  • Group identity -- France -- Alsace -- History,
  • Alsace (France) -- History -- 19th century,
  • Alsace (France) -- History -- 20th century,
  • Alsace (France) -- Ethnic relations,
  • Alsace (France) -- History -- Autonomy and independence movements

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementChristopher J. Fischer.
    SeriesContemporary european history -- v. 5
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDC650.5 .F56 2010
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23945008M
    ISBN 109781845457242
    LC Control Number2009047794

    Language family. Alsatian is closely related to other nearby Alemannic dialects, such as Swiss German, Swabian, and Markgräflerisch as well as is often confused with Lorraine Franconian, a more distantly related Franconian dialect spoken in the northwest corner of Alsace and in neighbouring other dialects and languages, Alsatian has also Native to: France. The Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine (German: Reichsland Elsaß-Lothringen or Elsass-Lothringen; Alsatian: 's Rìchslànd Elsàss-Lothrìnga; Moselle Franconian/Luxembourgish: D'Räichland Elsass-Loutrengen) was a territory created by the German Empire in , after it annexed most of Alsace and the Moselle department of Lorraine following its victory in the Capital: Straßburg (Strasbourg).

    The history of Alsace is kind of long But it's really interesting! Here is the very condensed version. I wrote it so that you can skip around and go to . Alsace is the Germanic region of France. It is a region lying on the west bank of the river Rhine, between the Rhine and the Vosges mountains. To the north and east it shares a border with Germany; to the south with German-speaking Switzerland, and to the west with Lorraine and Franche Comté. Historically speaking, Alsace was part of the German-speaking area of .

    Get this from a library! Alsace to the Alsatians?: visions and divisions of Alsatian regionalism, [Christopher J Fischer]. While the Dreyfus affair (–) by and large played out in France, and Alsace was a part of Germany at the time, it had immediate repercussions for the Jews in Alsace. Alfred Dreyfus was by birth a citizen of Mulhouse and thus suspected by French conservatives of innate sympathy with the German enemy by virtue of his being Alsatian and.


Share this book
You might also like
NAHB-OSHA trenching and excavation safety handbook =

NAHB-OSHA trenching and excavation safety handbook =

Simple checkmates

Simple checkmates

great audience

great audience

American Surety Co., of New York.

American Surety Co., of New York.

A few days in Athens

A few days in Athens

Count on confidence

Count on confidence

W. Averell Harriman

W. Averell Harriman

Landscape of Remembrance.

Landscape of Remembrance.

Goodbye, Saigon

Goodbye, Saigon

Subject choice

Subject choice

Dali and Surrealism

Dali and Surrealism

Ignacio Chaves and others.

Ignacio Chaves and others.

The closing door

The closing door

The education of the child in the light of anthroposophy

The education of the child in the light of anthroposophy

Alsace to the Alsatians? by Christopher J. Fischer Download PDF EPUB FB2

Alsace presents a unique case of a people denying its own cultural roots. Alsatians fell under the spell of France although France never understood Alsace and always despised it for its servile adulation. German by race, temperament, language, culture many Alsatians it is true have displayed a Alsace to the Alsatians?

book desire to be French since the XIX by: “In presenting Alsatian history from the perspective of Alsatian regionalists, Fischer makes a valuable contribution to the historiography of Alsace, and of Germany, France and regionalism more generally.” Australian Journal of Politics and History/5(2).

The Hardcover of the Alsace to the Alsatians?: Visions and Divisions of Alsatian Regionalism, by Christopher J. Fischer at Barnes & Noble. Due to COVID, orders may be :   Book description: The region of Alsace, located between the hereditary enemies of France and Germany, served as a trophy of war four times between – With each shift, French and German officials sought to win the allegiance of the local populace.

In response to these pressures, Alsatians invoked Pages: The author shows that the Janus-faced character of Alsatian regionalism points to the ambiguous role of regional identity in both fostering and inhibiting loyalty to.

Alsace to the Alsatians by Christopher J. Fischer,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. Chapter 5 “Ne toucher pas de choses d’Alsace”: The Return of French Rule to Alsace, – (pp.

) In the weeks following the November Armistice, windows and balconies were bedecked in blue, red, and white bunting and Alsatians poured into the streets to greet French troops. The Alsatians remained fiercley patriotic Frenchmen.

They resisted integration and "My Alsace" is a wonderful example of Alsace to the Alsatians? book struggle. Inthe writer Jean Jacques Waltz (Oncle Hansi) decided to write his own history of Alsace for the children of the region.

It was an act of political resistance and Waltz suffered State reprisals for his efforts.5/5(8). Learning Alsatian by: Paul Adolf There is a book for English speakers who want to learn the Alsatian language.

You can find it in a few American bookshops and find it on the internet. A merry Christmas and a happy New Year. E scheeni Wihnàchte un e glicklichs Nejjuhr. Sincerely, Paul Adolf "Learning Alsatian through English".

The main value of the book is in identifying the town of origin of an Alsatian ancestor, because this is one of the few region-wide indexes for those of us researching Alsace.

Some people who participate on this list have been able to find their. Alsatian regionalism however, was neither unitary nor unifying, as Alsatians themselves were divided politically, socially, and culturally.

The author shows that the Janus-faced character of Alsatian regionalism points to the ambiguous role of regional identity in both fostering and inhibiting loyalty to the nation.

Names from the Alsace Emigration Book See Also: Home Page for This Genealogy Emigration Sources The Alsace Emigration Book. These names are drawn from The Alsace Emigration Book, volumes 1 and 2, by Cornelia Schrader-Muggenthaler.I have collected names by community, in order to identify people who might have emigrated together.

Alsatians tried—unsuccessfully—to make the case that Alsace’s particularities were not German but Alsatian. Still, as the author shows, this Franco-Alsatian discourse depended very much on the ever-changing international situation, on the varying degrees of tension between France and Germany during that : Detmar Klein.

Emigration from Alsace, which was at times comparable in size to Scottish emigration, was far more discreet. The Alsatians were easily assimilated and mixed without prejudice with other settlers. Above all they wanted land so many of them became farmers and this was a good way to become an American in the 19th century.

Ideally situated at the heart of Europe, Alsace is easy to get to, thanks to a dense, well-developed network and a multitude of means of transport. Find out more Download a brochure4/5(1). The people of Alsace continued to speak a German dialect known as Alsatian, but the use of French spread among the upper classes.

From to Alsace actively participated in French national life. The introduction of universal suffrage () and the building of railways helped to bind France and its eastern frontier province closely together. The author shows that the Janus-faced character of Alsatian regionalism points to the ambiguous role of regional identity in both fostering and inhibiting loyalty to the nation.

Finally, the author uses the case of Alsace to explore the traditional designations of French civic nationalism versus German ethnic nationalism and argues for the strong similarities between Brand: Berghahn Books. It is a nice book for those interested in French country life, Alsace and France in general.

There are many fun characters described by these folks. The cuisine of the region is a lot of fun and delicious. The book also captures the spirit of the place, with /5(16).

A German dialect spoken in Alsace (France), has rapidly lost way to French since This book investigates language choice, language attitudes and ethnic identity in Alsace today. The Alsatian case study points out the complex interrelationship of linguistic and identity change with historical, social and psychological processes.

It is generally known that a significant number of Alsatians emigrated to Russia in There were several Alsace villages in the Odessa district as one can clearly recognize by the location names of Straszburg, Elsasz, Seltz, Mariental and Sulz. The region of Alsace, located between the hereditary enemies of France and Germany, served as a trophy of war four times between - With each shift, French and German officials sought to win the allegiance of the local populace.

In response to these pressures, Alsatians invoked regionalism - articulated as a political language, a cultural vision, and a community of. In Alsace to the Alsatians? Christopher J. Fischer offers a fascinating account of the development, evolution and varieties of regionalism in the border region of Alsace.

Under German rule between andthen governed by France between andthe region was subject to successive policies intended to integrate the population into Author: Alison Carrol.Alsace is the name of an Eastern Province of France. It is small in size, about 3, square miles.

Here you see Alsace on this map of Western Europe. Today it is a part of France. In some books I found that Alsace was in Germany. It’s sometimes in Germany, sometimes in France. It depends on the historical period.